Monthly Archives: May 2014

Office 2013 Administrative Templates

If you don’t already use a Central Store and ADMX files for managing Group Policy, installing and configuring the Office 2013 ADMX files in a Central Store will prevent you from being able to manage the default Admin Templates, like System, Control Panel, etc. You will also need to install the Server 2008 R2 Administrative Templates as well to restore this functionality. These can be downloaded from here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=6243.

Follow the instructions from here to install

Download the Office AMDX templates from: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=35554

The architecture doesn’t matter, as the ADMX files and ADML files are identical.

Extract the relevant file to a temporary location.

Create a folder in %SYSTEMROOT%sysvoldomainpolicies called policydefinitions

Copy the ADMX files from the temporary location to the policydefinitions folder

Copy the language folders (containing the ADML resource files) of the languages you wish to use from the temporary location to the policydefinitions folder

Open Group Policy Management. Create a new policy object. Under both Computer Configuration and User Configuration, the Office 2013 Administrative Templates are now available.

The above process and additionally be used for any ADMX templates.

 

References: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/02633470-396c-4e34-971a-0c5b090dc4fd

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc179081

Install Server 2008 R2 Administrative Templates (use ADMX files)

To install the Server 2008 R2 / Windows 7 Administrative Templates, download them from: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=6243

On the server, open the %systemroot%sysvoldomainpolices folder.

If the PolicyDefinitions folder doesn’t exist, create it.

Install the Server 2008 R2 / Windows 7 Administrative Templates to either a workstation or the server.

Once installed, navigate to the location you installed them to (default c:program files (x86)Microsoft Group Policywin72008r2).

Open the PolicyDefinitions folder.

Copy the ADMX files to the %SYSTEMROOT%sysvoldomainpoliciesPolicyDefinitions folder

Copy the language folders (containing the ADML resource files) of the languages you wish to use to the %SYSTEMROOT%sysvoldomainpoliciesPolicyDefinitions folder

Get File Version using Powershell

 

Trying to get the file version of an .EXE file using Powershell, I found the following interesting commands.

This will get the file version of an individual file:

(Get-Command %FILEPATH%).FileVersionInfo

Where %FILEPATH% is the path to a file

eg:

(Get-Command “C:Program FilesInternet ExplorerIExplore.exe”).FileVersionInfo

This will get a list of files in a directory.  (You can also add –recurse to the Get-ChildItem cmdlet to search subdirectories as well)

Get-ChildItem %FILEEXT% | ForEach-Object{Get-Command $_.FullName} | Select –Expand File*

Where %FILEEXT% is the file extension you wish to list.

eg:

Get-ChildItem “C:Program FilesInternet Explorer*.exe” | ForEach-Object(Get-Command $_.FullName} | Select –Expand File*

Using the first method, if you pipe the results to Get-Member instead of looking at the FileVersionInfo property, you can see there are also a number of other properties available:

CommandType; Definition; Extension; Module; ModuleName; Name; OutputType; Parameters; ParameterSets; Path; RemotingCapability; Visibility; FileVersionInfo; HelpUri

Reference:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/30686/get-file-version-in-powershell

Canon ImageRunner Universal Send Error Codes

Canon ImageRunners (like most MFC units) have numerical error codes, and I usually have trouble finding out what these are.  Here (open in a new window / PDF) is a list of the Send Error Codes.  The document is in english but was from an Italian website, and so the page numbers are in Italian.
 
I have posted a similar article for a Xerox here.  (New window)

Edit: spelling